When to consider a Trapeziectomy?

 

When non-operative treatments have failed to control the pain and the pain is:
-Moderate to severe
-Constant/ all the time
-Affecting sleep
-Stopping you from carrying out activities of daily living


What to expect after your ‘Trapeziectomy’ operation.

 

Trapeziectomy’s are normally performed as day case surgery under a general anaesthetic or a regional block (where the arm is made numb using an injection).


You will be sent home with dressings or a POP on and be seen by the consultant in 2/52 to remove the dressings.


At this point you may be seen by a hand therapist who will:


-Provide a splint to be worn as protection as your thumb heals
-Give exercises to help you re-gain movement in your thumb
-Give advice on what kind of activity you should/shouldn’t be performing
-Give advice on strengthening your thumb

 

Things to consider before having a Trapeziectomy:


-Risk of infection through surgery
-Risk of nerve injury/ neuroma. A small nerve running through the region of where the surgeon is operating can be damaged during surgery. It may form a painful spot on / near the scar (a neuroma)
-Rehabilitation can take between 4-12 months
-Results from trapeziectomy vary depending on may different factors i.e the individual, other health problems, severity of arthritis etc.
-80% of patients experience decrease in pain following surgery, 15% experience little or no change in pain and function and 5% are worse than before they had surgery
-Risk of problematic scar tissue. After the operation there is a risk that you may have problems with scarring including tender/ sensitive scarring. Thick/ hard scarring causing reduced movement
-Risk of problematic scar tissue. After the operation there is a risk that you may have problems with scarring including tender/ sensitive scarring. Thick/ hard scarring causing reduced movement